Sunday, June 2, 2024

Two old ones: Sears No 113 & Sears No C2001

black and white and sepia catalog drawn images of Sears No. 113 in the 1914 catalog • Sears No. C2001 in the 1917 catalog
Sears No. 113 in the 1914 catalog • Sears No. C2001 in the 1917 catalog

Matthew and I have both recently come across examples of two of the big, old models that Sears offered early on, that weren't in the catalogs once the 1918 switch was made to naming the models, instead of just marketing them by number. Matthew's was an especially exciting find-- the No. C2001-- because it is the first and only example that our group has found (or that we know of anyone having ever found) of this model. Let's take a look!

Sears Modern Home No. 113

I was Google "driving" around Catskill, New York one day, recently-- for what reason I was in this town, particularly, I can't even remember. And I stumbled across this really nice example of the Sears No. 113. Its front view is a bit obscured by foliage, but we get some really great side and rear views. We only have 8 examples of this old model, on our national list, so I was excited to add another (and really excited to just come across it, just like that). I don't have any interior views, nor do I have any information on who may have lived here and built this, originally, but I'll show you the Google maps Streetview photos that I snagged. 

color photo of light blue old house, Sears Modern Home No. 113
Sears Modern Home No. 113 • 164 Spring Street, Catskill, New York
You can just barely see the left side upper gambrel style large dormer, and we see the upper front bay window, and then the front porch with its centered front door, flanked by a good size window on each side of it. In the catalog, we see these porch columns... rounded columns, with a kind of curled Ionic capital.

color photo of light blue old house, Sears Modern Home No. 113
Sears Modern Home No. 113 • 164 Spring Street, Catskill, New York
This is the angle of the catalog image-- too covered by foliage here, though.

color photo of light blue old house, Sears Modern Home No. 113
Sears Modern Home No. 113 • 164 Spring Street, Catskill, New York
Here is the side porch, side entry door, and side bay window into the dining room.

color photo of light blue old house, Sears Modern Home No. 113
Sears Modern Home No. 113 • 164 Spring Street, Catskill, New York
This is a rare view of the rear of a Sears No 113. The large back window on the first floor, looks into the dining room; the small window is at the pantry; and the back door goes into a small entry mud room area leading into the kitchen.

Sears called these porch columns Colonial, I think because of their smooth, rounded style, but the capitals are of the Ionic design, that I believe we see in both Roman and Greek capitals.

close up color photo from Streetview of Sears No 113 porch columns with Ionic capitals

color infographic of column capital styles
Here's a little visual primer from Encyclopedia Britannica, showing some of the historic capital designs.
(source)

The No 113 was only in the catalogs for a few years, from the first catalogs in 1908, through 1914. It was never offered as a pre-cut/ cut-and-fitted model... it came as a bundled kit, but with standard length framing lumber (so, you wouldn't find any ink-stamped letter/number combos on any of the boards in the house, but you would maybe find paper shipping labels from Sears, affixed to the back of trim pieces around doors and windows, or crown or floor moulding, for example... like you see on this page of our research group's website).

sepia tone black and white drawing of Sears Modern Home No. 113 in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog
Sears Modern Home No. 113 in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

sepia tone black and white drawing of Floor plan of the Sears Modern Home No. 113 in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog
Floor plan of the Sears Modern Home No. 113 in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

sepia tone page giving Specifics on the catalog page for the Sears Modern Home No. 113, in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog
Specifics on the catalog page for the Sears Modern Home No. 113, in the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

Let me show you a few of the other examples of the No 113, that we have on our national list of Sears Houses in the U.S.:

color photo from Streetview, Modern Home No 113 in Dubach, Louisiana
This Modern Home No 113 is in the village of Vienna, part of Dubach, Louisiana. We learned of it through comments from the Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation (and they refer to it as being located in the Lincoln Parish village of Vienna, just north of Ruston). Apparently, the original owner worked for the railroad, and could walk to his job through his back yard. Though we can't see the right side, the assessor's sketch for the house shows a space for the side portico.

In West Springfield, Massachusetts, we found a No. 113 for sale several years ago. This house was a testimonial house, meaning that the original owner wrote in to Sears, sending a photo of the house, after building it, to say how pleased he was with the house. That original owner's name was Frederick G. Phinney, according to Rebecca L. Hunter's book, Putting Sears Homes on the Map, A Compilation of Testimonials Included In Sears Modern Homes Catalogs (Sears mistakenly listed his name as Phimery, however). According to the 1920 U.S. Census, Phinney was the manager of a cigar store, and lived here with his wife, Maude, and their son, Clarence, and daugher, Madaline. The city directory shows Phinney at this address beginning in 1916, but he is listed as early as 1911 at 8 Boulevard, so it's possible that house numbers changed, and he was actually in this house as early as that.

The house has since been bought, re-sided with vinyl (sadly), and fixed up inside for re-sale. Fortunately, they kept much of the beautiful original wood flooring and most all of the original woodwork inside, though they have done the modern grey and white look for the modernized kitchen and bath. Still... we're glad it's still standing! You can see real estate photos here

Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts

Before the house was bought and re-sided, you could see that it had the Sears Colonial porch columns, though with a simpler capital attaching them to the porch roof soffit.

color photo featuring original, refinished hardwood floors and big bay window, inside dining room area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts
Dining room area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts

color photo featuring original refinished hardwood floors in Parlor area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts
Parlor area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts

color photo featuring original refinished hardwood floors and original chunky craftsman newel Staircase in entry reception area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts
Staircase in entry reception area of the Sears Modern Home No 113 • 20 North Boulevard, West Springfield, Massachusetts

In Dunkirk, New York, architectural historian Rebecca L. Hunter (KitHouse.org ; Mail Order Homes- Sears Homes and Other Kit Houses ; Putting Sears Homes on the Map, A Compilation of Testimonials Included In Sears Modern Homes Catalogs) located a Sears No. 113 a number of years ago. In 2018, our researcher, Sarah Mullane (foremost specialist in the country on Bennett kit Homes), traveled from her home in the Buffalo area of New York, to see this house, and photograph it for a blog post that she did on a number of Sears houses in this neighborhood. You can see the blog post and photos here, on her August 2018 post on her blog, Catalog Homes of Western New York.
color photo of front of Sears Modern Home No 113 at 19 Taft Place, Dunkirk, New York
Sears Modern Home No 113 at 19 Taft Place, Dunkirk, New York

Finally, a few months ago, Matthew found this really beautiful Modern Home No. 113 in Wheeling, West Virginia. The left side view shows an addition where the side portico is, normally, but Matthew consulted an old Sanborn map of the street, and it showed the outline of the footprint of the house, having a bumped out section for that expected portico. We do see the expected bank of triple windows on that side, still.

color photo of front and right side of  Sears Modern Home No. 113, 62 Heiskell Avenue, Wheeling, West Virginia
Sears Modern Home No. 113, 62 Heiskell Avenue, Wheeling, West Virginia. Happy to see the original siding and the original rounded colonial porch columns!

color photo of left side and front of  Sears Modern Home No. 113, 62 Heiskell Avenue, Wheeling, West Virginia

Sears Modern Home No. 113, 62 Heiskell Avenue, Wheeling, West Virginia

Sears Modern Home No. C2001

Matthew posted this find just today, in our research group... just nonchalantly, as if it were just another Sears house find :) But, it's not! It's one of the "missing models", meaning one of the models Sears sold, that no one has yet found a standing example of. And, this model was only in the 1916 and 1917 catalogs, so it's a really rare one. It's not a super cute, really lovely old model, but it's a good size farmhouse style house, and we're happy to have it added to our list! 

color photo from street, of exterior of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

color photo from street, of exterior of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

color photo from street, of exterior of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

color photo from street, of exterior of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Side view, Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

color photo from street, of exterior, left side, of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Side and rear view, Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

color photo from street, of close up of porch soffit of Sears Modern Home No. C2001 • 640 6th Avenue, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
Close up of the porch soffit... you can see the keystones that are shown in the catalog image.
The C2001 was never given any other name, and was only briefly in the catalogs. The only time we see the houses marketed with a C before the numbers, was in certain editions of the 1916 and 1917 catalogs. This was when the pre-cut/cut-to-fit system began being offered by Sears, and some of those catalogs showed a table of the houses that were offered only as Standard-length framing lumber kits, and those offered with pre-cut/cut-to-fit framing lumber. The C2001 was offered only as a pre-cut/already-cut-and-fitted model. Here it is in the 1917 catalog:
sepia tone black and white catalog page for Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog
Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog

sepia toned black and white drawing of Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog
Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog

sepia toned black and white print writeup of specifics for Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog
Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog

sepia toned black-and-white drawing of floor plan of Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog
Floor plan, Sears Modern Home No. C2001, 1917 Sears Modern Homes Catalog

That's it for these fun finds of Sears Modern Homes that are over 100 years old! 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
For more information on who we are, and what we do, visit our website: SearsHouses.com

(NOTE: This blog is best seen in WEB view, to access the many informational links in the side bar.)

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Sears Hazelton in West Price Hill in Cincinnati

Sears Hazelton model front and right side view color photo with yard
Sears Hazelton1028 Coronado Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio


Sears Hazelton in my 1920 catalog
I've written about the Sears Hazelton a number of times before... but, when this one came up for sale recently, I was really pleased to see how lovely it still is, inside, with so much original detailing. Usually, we're excited to see our Ohio Sears houses showcased by Cindy Catanzaro, on her Sears Houses In Ohio blog, but she graciously allowed me to write about this one (Cindy is the one who added this house to our national list, but her blog posts are most often about houses she has found through mortgage research, or houses that she has visited in person). So, I decided to document the house with a blog post dedicated mostly to seeing the inside of a really good example of a Sears Hazelton.  If you'd like to learn more about the several "lookalikes" to the Sears Hazelton, that were offered by other companies, you can check out this 2015 blog post of mine, about a Sears Hazelton in Guthrie Center, Iowa. This 2018 blog post of mine, about a Sears Hazelton in Edwardsville, Illinois, shows a detailed comparison of how the rooms inside match up to the floor plan, and shows a few other Hazelton examples I've written about. In 2016, I wrote a pretty detailed analysis of a house that I initially thought was an example of the Gordon-Van Tine No. 573 (lookalike to the Hazelton), but after taking a close look at the doors in the hallway, I came to the conclusion that it didn't work for either the GVT model, or the Sears Hazelton (read that blog post here).

Who Lived Here? 
We always try to authenticate the houses we find, by tying them to Sears somehow, with blueprints, building permits, or mortgage records or deeds through Sears, if possible... but this house has not been authenticated through those methods. So, I thought I'd at least see how far back the owners were listed on the Hamilton County Ohio auditor page, to see if I could pinpoint who the probable first owners were, and when the house was built. The property records give a build year of 1922 for this house... and Ohio  records are usually pretty accurate (compared to other counties in other states around the U. S.). But, I believe that the first residents of this house, began living there in 1917. Let's take a look at the records for the Von Schlichten family.

The earliest owner listed on the property card for this house, is Bertha VonSchlichten, in 1943, and then sisters of hers, Olga and Clara Von Schlichten, in subsequent years through 1965 (and, I believe that the 1967 owner, Bertha Schultz, is Bertha VonSchlichten):
typed property card, white background, black typing
Property card for Sears Hazelton at 1028 Coronado Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio

Since that date is pretty far back, I thought that these could be members of the original family, so I turned to Ancestry to research those names. Sure enough, I discovered that Bertha and Olga and Clara were all daughters of Marie Von Schlichten, and her late husband, Alexander Von Schlichten. Marie died in 1943, which explains the passing on of the house to Bertha, one of her daughters:
black and white newsprint image of Obituary in the Cincinnati Enquirer, February 1943, for Marie Schathameyer Von Schlichten
Obituary in the Cincinnati Enquirer, February 1943, for Marie Schathameyer Von Schlichten

Continuing with records in Ancestry and Newspapers.com, I discovered that Marie's husband, Alexander, had died in 1909. His obituary information on the Find-A-Grave website, lists links to the obituary information for Marie, as well, and for most of their children. It mentions that Alexander was a pastor,  The Reverand Alexander Von Schlichten, and that he pastored at the Evangelical Lutheran Trinity Church from 1879-1909. I was surprised to find that Marie had actually been born (in 1853) in the city of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (the area where I live)! I dug a little more deeply into her family and found that they moved to Chicago by the time her second brother was born in 1857, so I couldn't track down a St. Louis address for them. You can see more about Marie's life story on this page of Ancestry, as there is an extensive family tree available, and her Find-A-Grave website information is here.
image from Ancestry.com showing birth and death dates, parents, and biographical summary for Marie Schachameyer Von Schlichten
Here is a short summary of the life story facts for Marie Schachameyer Von Schlichten, from Ancestry. One of the things that my 21st century female brain finds annoying about these old records, is the all-too-often reality that women were so often just continually pregnant... 12 children born in a span of 23 years. 

Using Cincinnati city directories, I was able to track down that the first year that Marie and her children lived on Coronado Avenue, was 1917. There was no house number given that year, or for a few more years, but the description of "e s Coronado Ave n of Rapid Run Pike" is spot on for the location of 1028 Coronado Avenue (east side, north of Rapid Run):

black and white text from cincinnati city directory listing members of the Von Schlichten family on Coronado Avenue
1917 City Directory for Cincinnati, showing Marie Von Schlichten and several of her children, on Coronado Avenue.

In 1916, Marie and several of her children, are listed at a different address, on Clifton Avenue in Cincinnati:
black and white text from cincinnati city directory listing members of the Von Schlichten family on Clifton Avenue
1916 City Directory for Cincinnati, showing Marie Von Schlichten and several of her children, living on Clifton Avenue

The 1920 U.S. Census does give a street address, and puts the family at 1028 Coronado Avenue, the site of our lovely Sears Hazelton:
colorful snippet of hand-written section of 1920 U.S. Census for Cincinnati, showing Marie Von Schlichten and several of her children, living at 1028 Coronado Avenue
1920 U.S. Census for Cincinnati, showing Marie Von Schlichten and several of her children, living at 1028 Coronado Avenue

So... considering that the Hazelton was available in 1917, I think it's likely that the Marie Von Schlichten family were the first owners and residents of the Sears Hazelton

How Much Did the Hazelton Cost?
Here is this model in the 1916 Sears Modern Homes catalog. In 1916, the models were not yet given a name, they were referred to by model numbers. This model was marketed at $1,138 for the "C2025" kit, which was a pre-cut kit ("already cut and fitted"), or $1,075 for the kit with standard-length framing boards, "not cut and fitted". Of course, remember that people also had to have already purchased the lot for any Sears house that they built, and there were a few extra items not included in the basic kit price (choice of heating system, choice of plumbing system, and choice of electrical wiring system, and any masonry items had to be purchased locally, though Sears would set you up with a supplier in your area), and people often also engaged carpenters to build for them, or to at least help them build.
black and white drawing of Sears Hazelton (No 2025 or No 172) in the 1916 Sears Modern Homes catalog
Here is the Sears Hazelton as it was offered in the 1916 Sears Modern Homes catalog

From the 1916 catalog page showing the Hazelton (No 172, No 2025)

The 1918 Sears Modern Homes catalog uses the model name Hazelton, offering the model for a significantly higher price than the 1916 catalog:
black and white drawing showing the Sears Hazelton 1918 Sears Modern Homes catalog priced at $1921 for the pre-cut kit
Sears Hazelton in the 1918 Sears Modern Homes catalog

It's a good thing that the Von Schlichten family didn't wait until 1920 to buy their Hazelton, because we see it offered in three different catalogs from 1920, at between $2,986 and $3,750! The price of $3,750 was listed as being on a special reduced sale in one of the catalogs that year, saying that you could get the house kit for only $3,375 up until November 1 of 1920, and another, later edition of the 1920 catalog, still lists the Hazelton at $3,750, but offers a special sale price until February of 1921, down to $2, 986.

catalog page mention of Special sale price of the Sears Hazelton kit, in one of the 1920 Sears Modern Homes catalogs

catalog price list showing Special sale price of the Sears Hazelton kit, in one of the 1920 Sears Modern Homes catalogs
Special sale price of the Sears Hazelton kit, in one of the 1920 Sears Modern Homes catalogs.

Throughout all of the years, however, it shared this one floor plan:

black and white drawing from the catalog, showing Sears Hazelton first floor floor plan
Sears Hazelton first floor floor plan

The catalog doesn't show the upstairs rooms, but most of the time, there are finished rooms upstairs. As as result, there is no upstairs staircase indicated on the floor plan, but this house in Cincinnati has the staircase in the same spot as does the Hazelton in Edwardsville, Illinois ... along an inner wall of the back bedroom:
catalog floor plan next to photo of kitchen and back bedroom, showing Location of the up staircase inside the Sears Hazelton in Edwardsville, Illinois
Location of the up staircase inside the Sears Hazelton in Edwardsville, Illinois (blog post here)

Here's the same view (already into the bedroom) of that room and the staircase location, on the Hazelton on Coronado Avenue in Cincinnati:
color photo of back bedroom, showing Staircase going upstairs, Sears Hazelton on Coronado Avenue in Cincinnati
Staircase going upstairs, Sears Hazelton on Coronado Avenue in Cincinnati

Let's see the inside!
Without further ado (and without much explanation per photo), let's take a look at the interior photos of this really nice Sears Hazelton. One of my favorite aspects of this house, is that it still has the original hardwood flooring, in nice condition, in many rooms (and surely still there under the carpeting in other rooms). All of these photos came from the current real estate listing, which you can see here, on Trulia.

front view color photo of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

front porch color photo, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of interior side of front door, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo, living room of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of living room of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of living room and dining room of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo focused on dining room of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of dining room, showing bump out windows, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
The little, skinny windows that we see on the side walls of the bumped-out wall section of the dining room, are helpful in verifying this as a likely authentic Sears Hazelton, as some of the "lookalikes" don't have these (however, at least one other company did also have those).

color photo looking from dining room into living room, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
There's the other little skinny window.

color photo of dining room, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
This door from the dining room into the kitchen, also has the Sears Stratford design door handle backplate 

color closeup photo of Stratford design door hardware on Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of dining room and living room and hall entry, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of modernized kitchen, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
Obviously, the kitchen has been brought into modern times, so this is certainly not the original set of kitchen cabinets, but the location of everything (including the vent chimney and side windows), is correct.

color photo of modernized kitchen, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of modernized kitchen, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of modernized kitchen of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of interior of enclosed back porch, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of back bedroom as office, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of staircase location of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of front bedroom, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of bedroom with added closet space, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of upstairs bedroom space, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of upstairs bedrooms and connecting hall, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of upstairs bedroom in front dormer space, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
Here's the room in the front dormer! I'm always intrigued by dormer rooms.

color photo of upstairs bedroom, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of bathroom, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of bathroom, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of back deck and enclosed back porch, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

color photo of back yard and back view of Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH
Though the back porch is enclosed now, the original back door of the house, and the two windows on the back wall, are consistent with the floor plan of the Hazelton, and so is the placement of the little back porch.

Although we don't have authenticating documents for this house, we are confident that it is from Sears, because it has Sears Stratford design door handle backplates, and hinges of a design that we have only ever seen from Sears. They are visible on the inside of the front door:
color photo of interior door showing Stratford door hardware and Sears-only hinge, Sears Hazelton 1028 Coronado Ave Cincinnati OH

Sears hinge and Stratford hardware shown in black and white drawing in Sears catalog
I don't remember which catalog I grabbed this from, but probably from the 1920 Sears Modern Homes catalog. Sears offered Stratford design door hardware, and this hinge, for many years.

That's it for the many views of the interior and exterior of this Sears Hazelton! I hope its new owners will appreciate its heritage, and continue to respect the quality elements in the house.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
For more information on who we are, and what we do, visit our website: SearsHouses.com

(NOTE: This blog is best seen in WEB view, to access the many informational links in the side bar.)